Daily miscellany

  1. From The Paris Review: This October, Damiani will release The Hungry Years, a collection of photographs by the artist Jack Pierson taken during the eighties at the height of the AIDS epidemic and featuring many of his friends.
  2. From Haaretz: The best North Korean films and books to discover in 2017.
  3. Paste Magazine reviews the new Latin American masters of literary horror.
  4. At Rhode Island Public Radio, author Ann Hood reflects on the books that shaped and changed her life.
  5. Rolling Stone reviews Good Booty, where critic Ann Powers goes deep into the history of eroticism in popular American music.
  6. From The New Yorker: Steamy summer reads: Spies, sex, and a total Eclipse. .
  7. At Lit Hub, an excerpt from Paul Lynch’s novel, Grace.
  8. From NPR: A review of The Red-Haired Woman by Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk.
  9. Los Angeles Review of Books reviews A Crack in Creation.
  10. From Omnivoracious: The best nonfiction of August.
  11. From The New York Times: Mystery writer Louise Penny recommends reading her fellow Canadian writer Margaret Atwood: “And I don’t just say that because the government compels me to.”

Daily miscellany

  1. From The Atlantic: Best-selling author Thomas E. Ricks submits a draft to his editor. Hijinks ensue.
  2. At On a Clear Day I Can Read Forever Nancy Pate reviews The Bedlam Stacks, Meddling Kids and The Blinds.
  3. From Omnivoracious: The best science fiction and fantasy of August.
  4. From Evening Standard: The best books being released as films this autumn.
  5. From Goodreads Blog: The season’s hottest debut novels.
  6. From JD DeHart : An Interview with Fierce Kingdom author Gin Phillips.
  7. The Millions interviews Goodbye, Vitamin author Rachel Khong.
  8. From NPR: Karl Ove Knausgaard — famed for his epic memoir My Struggle — goes for short and sweet in Autumn, a meditative seasonal reflection. But while there are lovely moments, the book strays into banality.
  9. From NPR: The 1950 film In A Lonely Place starring Humphrey Bogart and Gloria Grahame was adapted from a lesser-known 1947 novel by Dorothy B. Hughes. The novel’s just been re-released.
  10. From The New York Times: A review of Kristen Iskandrian’s novel Motherest. The narrator hoped college would be an escape from an unhappy home. Now she must make a home for her baby.
  11. From Omnivoracious: An interview with Ayobami Adebayo on Stay with Me.

Daily miscellany

  1. From USA Today: A review of Ghost of the Innocent Man: A True Story of Trial and Redemption, which recounts effort to clear man wrongfully convicted in rape.
  2. From Bustle: 11 books on the history of food that will make you think more about what’s on your plate.
  3. From USA Today: New and noteworthy books.
  4. From Daily Mail: Bestselling author Gill Hornby suggests key novels to help you through the trickier times in life.
  5. From Vox: What Mr. Mercedes understands that most Stephen King adaptations don’t.
  6. From amNY: New culinary books cover cheese, cider, peppers and more.
  7. From USA Today: Why the year 1922 rocked the book world.
  8. From ELLE: 27 of the best books to read this fall.
  9. From The New Yorker: Lauren Groff discusses the inspiration for the short story Dogs Go Wolf, in which two young sisters are trapped alone with a dog in the middle of a storm.
  10. From AOL: The top 20 most reviewed books of all time from Amazon.
  11. From Los Angeles Review of Books: A review of Keri Leigh Merritt’s Masterless Men.
  12. From The Los Angeles Times: Dear Jeff Bezos, If you care about authors, you’ll raise Amazon’s book prices.
  13. NPR reviews The Stone Sky, a powerful, timely finale to a trilogy of a world built on oppression and exploitation.
  14. From NPR: Young Jane Young is the story of a political sex scandal, told through the women who endure it.
  15. Gin Phillips at NPR talks to Scott Simon about her latest novel, Fierce Kingdom, a novel about every parent’s worst nightmare.
  16. From NPR: Set in Nigeria in the 1980s, Ayobami Adebayo’s debut novel, Stay With Me, tells the story of a couple who desperately want to have a child in a society where that’s what’s expected of them.
  17. From NPR: Sue Grafton’s latest novel, Y Is For Yesterday, is the second to last in a series spanning A to Z and 35 years worth of best-selling murder mysteries.
  18. From The New York TimesCultural Revolution Selfies, a new book by Wang Qiuhang, includes subversive images, taken during China’s Cultural Revolution, of the photographer himself.
  19. From The New York Times talks to Patricia Williams about her new memoir, Rabbit, where the standup comedian tells how she overcame a young life of poverty and drug dealing to become a performer.
  20. From Goodreads Blog: The best young adult books of August.
  21. From The New Yorker: Doreen St. Félix reviews Making Rent in Bed-Stuy, a memoir about living in Bedford-Stuyvesant by the filmmaker Brandon Harris.
  22. From The New York Times: A review of Rachel Seiffert’s novel A Boy in Winter, which probes the bonds and betrayals in a Ukrainian town as it succumbs to Hitler’s armies.
  23. From NPR: Anne Gisleson was reeling from a series of family tragedies when she began meeting with friends to discuss books and life in post-Katrina New Orleans. Her new book, The Futilitarians, chronicles a year of those meetings.
  24. From The New York Times: What to read before you head to Botswana.
  25. From NPR: What She Ate examines the lives of six different women — such as Eleanor Roosevelt and Cosmopolitan editor Helen Gurley Brown — through the food they ate. It’s called What She Ate by Laura Shapiro.
  26. From Omnivoracious: Amazon’s best books of August.
  27. From The New York Times: A review of See What I Have Done by Sarah Schmidt.
  28. From NYT > Books: A review of The Burning Girl by Claire Messud.
  29. From Omnivoracious: Washington State Book Award finalists announced. We always pay attention to the Washington State Book Awards, organized by The Washington Center for the Book.
  30. From Omnivoracious: Children’s books for back to school.

Daily miscellany

  1. From NPR: A review of The Stone Sky, a powerful, timely finale to this trilogy of a world built on oppression and exploitation.
  2. From Los Angeles Review of Books: A review of Keri Leigh Merritt’s Masterless Men.
  3. From NPR: Gin Phillips talks to Scott Simon about her latest novel, Fierce Kingdom, as novel about every parent’s worst nightmare.
  4. From The Los Angeles Times: Dear Jeff Bezos: If you care about authors, you’ll raise Amazon’s book prices.
  5. From NPR: Set in Nigeria in the 1980s, Ayobami Adebayo’s debut novel, Stay With Me, tells the story of a couple who desperately want to have a child, in a society where that’s what’s expected of them.
  6. From The New York Times: Cultural Revolution Selfies, a new book by Wang Qiuhang, includes subversive images, taken during China’s Cultural Revolution, of the photographer himself.
  7. From NPR: Young Jane Young is the story of a political sex scandal, told through the women who endure it.
  8. From USA Today: New and noteworthy books.

Daily miscellany

  1. From The Sydney Morning Herald: Children’s Book Council of Australia reveal the best books of 2017.
  2. From NPR: The stories in Jenny Zhang’s powerful debut collection, Sour Heart center on the violent, sometimes disturbing experiences of young Chinese-American girls growing up in Queens, NY.
  3. From POPSUGAR: Our favorite books of the year (so far).
  4. From Runner’s World: The latest books on running (and endurance) Science.
  5. From The Paris Review: Reading recommendations from ‘Paris Review’ contributors Ben Lerner, Emily Wilson, Steph Burt, and more.
  6. From The New York Times: The best-selling author Nelson DeMille wanted a house that was appropriately large and Tudor-style — just not too Tudor.
  7. From The New York Times: In three new thrillers the search is on: for a missing best friend, a possibly dead mom and a really angry stalker.
  8. From The New York Times: In his latest book, Surfing With Sartre, the philosopher Aaron James finds profound meaning in his favorite pastime.
  9. From The New York Times: Yuri Slezkine’s The House of Government tells the story of Bolshevik elites who became targets of their own terror.
  10. From The New York Times: Six new paperbacks to check out this week.
  11. From The New York Times: The protagonists of two summer novels, by Nina George and Hannah Tunnicliffe, discover the lives they really want in the French region of Brittany.
  12. From The New York Times: Svetlana Alexievich’s The Unwomanly Face of War collects memories of the Russian women who fought against Hitler.
  13. From The New York Times: A writer finds commercial success in Scott Spencer’s novel River Under the Road, but at what cost to his self-esteem and his marriage?
  14. From The New York Times: In Christopher Bollen’s new literary thriller, The Destroyers, a young playboy vanishes on the Greek island of Patmos.

Daily miscellany

  1. From The Dallas News: The best part of Andrew Gross’ new anti-Nazi thriller? It really happened.
  2. The New York Times looks at Instagram’s impact on book sales.
  3. Tyler Cowen interviews Dave Berry on humor, writing and Florida.
  4. From The New York Times: 3 books on North Korea and the threat of nuclear war.
  5. From NPR: The next chapter For dystopian literature. Everyone dies in the end.
  6. From The Millions: Major shelf envy. The Guardian has photos of A Little Life author Hanya Yanagihara‘s New York City apartment and its 12,000 – yes 12,000 – books.
  7. From Electric Literature: 60 Years of Elmore Leonard on Screen. We look back at the crime master’s legacy and rank the 10 best movies and shows from a flashy, sexy,…
  8. From The New York Times: 10 new books we recommend this week.
  9. From Omnivoracious: The rich are different: A book list. Love ’em or hate ’em, here’s a list that’s probably got a book that’s right for you.
  10. From Omnivoracious: Kamila Shamsie talks to the Amazon Book Review about her new novel, Home Fire.

The Amish take on the apocalypse in ‘When the English Fall’

When the English Fall reviewsFirst-time novelist David Williams writes a compassionate post-apocalypse novel as told from the point of view of an Amish farmer. When the English Fall (Algonquin Books, digital galley) shows that while choosing to do the right thing is easier to do when you can put faith in guiding principles. While written in a measured voice, When the English Fall is a page turner.

When the English Fall reviews

Daily miscellany

  1. From Los Angeles Review of Books: The Marikana Massacre, five years later.
  2. From JD DeHart: Three questions with author Piers Anthony.
  3. From Paste: The best new young adult books for August.
  4. A Chinese novelist is arrested in 4 murders from 2 decades ago. Liu Yongbiao, author of The Guilty Secret, had planned a novel about a writer who got away with a series of killings.
  5. From The New York Times: The pioneering programmer Ellen Ullman discusses her career and the dangers the internet poses to culture, privacy and civility in her new book Life in Code.
  6. From The New York TimesSue Grafton nears the end of her alphabet mysteries. Kinsey Millhone makes one of her last crime column appearances.
  7. From NPR: Sex is such an inextricable part of pop music, it’s easy to overlook, but NPR Music critic Ann Powers rectifies that in her new book, a portrait of America’s obsession with sex as it manifests in pop.
  8. From Los Angeles Review of Books: A review of Eka Kurniawan’s Vengeance Is Mine, All Others Pay Cash.
  9. From NPR: The lazy days of August call for getaway reading, so we’ve got three romances that’ll take you from old China to the small-town South, featuring couples who learn love is closer than they think.
  10. From Los Angeles Review of Books: A review of Yuri Slezkine’s The House of Government: A Saga of the Russian Revolution. You can also read an excerpt from the book.
  11. From NPR: A review of How To Behave In A Crowd.